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20121101
20121130
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KRCB (PBS) 12
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
lists of policies and often their wish lists of policies, after hurricane katrina there was a meeting at the heritage foundation just two weeks after the storm hit. parts of the city were still under water and there was a meeting and "the wall street journal" reported from it and the heading was 31 free market solutions for hurricane katrina and you go down the list and it was -- don't re-open the public schools. replace the public schools with vouchers and drill for oil in anwar and the arctic national wild life reserve and what kind of free market solutions are these? here you have a crisis that was created by a collision between heavy weather which may or may not have been linked to climate change and what climate change looks like and colliding with weak infrastructure because of years and years of neglect. let's get rid of the infrastructural together and drill for the oil which is the root cause of climate change. that's their shock doctrine, and i think it's time for people shock. >> people shock? >> which we've had before, if you think about 1929 and the market shock and the w
and then paid the price after katrina, and this president put it back up again and what not political people in, and it is paying off this week, it really is paying off. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the two candidates. here you have president obama citing fema as the vehicle to coordinate the federal effort, and you had mitt romney last year on the campaign saying he would get rid of fema, he would turn the responsibilities back to the states, showing no appreciation for the role that fema place. >> this is a nightmare for political candidate romney. >> it is, especially if you are going after swing votes, woman voters in ohio, the so-called waitress a vote. they want a president who will care for them and be a guardian. this is an ad for a president who worries about you. it is terrible for romney. it stopped his momentum. maybe the polls or all wrong and romney is going to win anyway, but if you looking at the polls right now, obama has got it. >> did ghani have momentum, was that republican --romney of momentum, or was that republican spin? >> he definitely add momentu
in the wake of a major disaster. so it's probably no surprise that back in 2005, hurricanes katrina and rita drained the fund and plunged the program $18 billion into debt. it's debt congress planned to forgive, but hasn't yet. that leaves the program on poor financial footing with only about $4 billion worth of funds available for claims related to sandy. >> from what i've seen, this could be a $5 billion to $10 billion flooding event, so more than likely, the program will have to go to congress to get additional borrowing authority. >> reporter: former program administrator david maurstad says the program will probably ve to turno coress for help paying claims. >> it's still an obligation that our government said we're going to have this program-- "you buy a policy, we're going to take care of it." and i have every confidence to believe that that will happen. there will be some mechanics that will be involved, possibly, depending on how large of an event this turns out to be. >> reporter: what could be a bigger problem are the number of people affected who don't have flood insurance. gener
with katrina. we learned with irene. we started with much larger cash supplies than we normally would have, and we've been able to manage that cash supply at a much higher level than we have right now than we've ever had before. >> tom: have you been able to replenish the cash supplies in those a.t.m. machines in a timely manner? >> we have been able to replenish. obviously, there will be an a.t.m. here or there that has a problem, that runs out of cash. there are lines at many of these a.t.m.s in the difficult areas, but even as the longest time, it's within the same day it's replenished. we do have story where's we move cash from one branch to the other to help the branches keep cash. we've beefed up the security force toking in throughout the tristate area. >> tom: frank, let me pull back a little bit from the day-to-day operations and i know you're focused on that. you have waived some bank fees for those affected customers in the region. is that going to be much of an impact when you talk about the fourth quarter business? >> i don't see this impact our fourth quarter business by wavi
. look, people warned katrina that new orleans needed to be able to withstand a category 5. they didn't design the levees to withstand it and we see what happed. nowe s theame thiith sandy. i think the hope has to be that sandy isn't short for cassandra and that it's another warning that we ignore. absolutely people now have seen that you can in fact have the worst-case scenario, which was a flooding of the lower manhattan and i think any city along the eastern sea board has ask-to-ask themselves what would happen if hurricane sandy hit us? >> suarez: well, how do we price risk, then, into the decisions we make both publicly and privately. should there with b places in new jersey,n new york, where surace companies s "we don't want to pay for you to rebuild right there"? where the cost of doing so becomes higher and maybe prohibitive for some people? >> there probably should be, yes, because the alternative is we keep enticing people to place more and more of their value, more and more of their wealth in fragile co-systems or fragile areas of the environment if we don't give them the p
from a katrina, from 9/11 and this happens and it reinforces. guess what, where were those people on 9/11 they were at the tip of manhattan and the same area that's getting hit so hard right now. there are other areas, i came into cbs this morning somebody said i'm up in rockland county, nobody's telling that story. nasa county out on the island, there are places our cameras aren't getting to. so the devastation. >> rose: because there are so many stories. >> that's right. >> rose: thank you very much. back in moment. stay with us. >> rose: al -- al -- al has not poire -- the government is due to change before the year is out with enrique pena becoming president in december. but the challenges facing the country remain the war on the drug cartels in relation with the united states will remain key areas of focus. i'm pleased to have alejandro poir at this table. welcome. >> thank you very much charlie. >> rose: i interviewed calderon, the president for another month i guess, month and-a-half here when he was in town for the clinton global initiative. i raised these questions wit
brown at the time of katrina. barack obama rebuilt it. and we are seeing it it work and respond. >> woodruff: do you think the storm could be making that much of a difference. >> i think the perception and you see activity and you see the chris christie thing. people are saying why is christie doing this, for his own mattal ambitions. >> i don't think there is anything like that when you are the governor of a state, a state you love that is in your heart and soul you feel an intense sense of stewardship. and when it gets wallopped by the storm the poll particulars seems irrelevant at this point. and as christie said, i don't care about the politics. if he is going to help me with my state, he is going to help the people of my state, then i'm grateful and i will work with him. so i think it is as simple as that. and i think he has been perfectly willing to hold the view that he's not a good steward of the economy, not good on budget negotiations but he's good on this. and we worked together on this. i don't think that is politically inconsistent. but nonetheless a a-- about where
in 2006. after hurricane katrina, swiss re's head of catastrophe perils, andy castaldi, worried aloud about warming seas and more violent storms in the gulf. but, he told me: >> i'm also concerned about the new york bay and long island would be inundated by a flood, due to a category 3 storm. a storm surge could completely flood the airport at jfk. 13 feet of sea water is not out of or to 17 feet is not out of the question. >> reporter: so the blue is sandy's storm surge. we interviewed castaldi again last week, after sandy. >> that's the footprint of the storm surge that was produced by the superstorm sandy, as you can see in the center of the screen is john f. kennedy airport. now i'm going to toggle back to the coastal flood map that we had prior to the storm and you can see just about the same areas as the sandy footprint we knew was exposed to a storm surge. >> reporter: six years ago, you said that you thought that climate change was a major factor in recent storm activity. do you think that more today? >> i can't really attribute sandy to climate change. it could be within the
with that hurricane. >> woodruff: comparisons being made to hurricane katrina, not only new jersey and new york. we also want to say this brings the electoral college projected total at this point-- it's early in the evening-- to 79 electoral votes for president obama 82 electoral vote for governor romney. we know we need 270-- they need 270 in order to become president. >> ifill: of course we have to talk about new jersey because david and mark, chris christie, the governor of the new jersey, royaled the wate a littlebit this week by actually having kind things to say about president obama, not that that accountedly the outcome in new jersey, a deeply blue state, but i wonder whether we're watching chris christie more closely. >> i think he did it for severe reasons. his state got whalloped. he was emotionally drawn as anybody in those circumstances. i don't think he was thinking of his future political process. i do think sandy had a political impact. i think the exit polls give some suggestion of that. and partly because they saw the president being effective, but partly because they saw him wor
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)